The Napoleonic Wars and the War of 1812

The Americans Attack Upper Canada

British Swept from Niagara Peninsula

Soldier, Upper Canada Incorporated Militia or Lower Canada Select Embodied Militia, 1813

Caption: Soldier, Upper Canada Incorporated Militia or Lower Canada Select Embodied Militia, 1813

One month later, on May 27, Dearborn attacked Fort George, the principal British stronghold on the Niagara Peninsula. Given the numerical superiority of the Americans, the Anglo-Canadian soldiers and militiamen abandoned the fort after defending it vigorously. British General John Vincent then withdrew along with his troops all the way to Burlington Bay, not far from Hamilton. The Americans sent a contingent of approximately 3,500 men after him. Soon afterwards, scouts reported to Vincent that the American camp at Stoney Creek was being guarded by only a few sentinels. On June 6, in the middle of the night, the 49th Regiment and five companies of the 8th charged into the American camp with fixed bayonets! General Winder, the Baltimore lawyer who owed his military rank to his political connections, was captured along with his artillery, and his soldiers scattered.

Additional Images

Trooper, Canadian Light Dragoons, 1813
Fort George, Upper Canada