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Organization > Canadian War Museum

Subject > Politics and Society > Social Conscience and Activism

Canada at War - Democracy at War - Canadian Newspapers and the Second World War

Type: DocumentImage

The war changed Canada. It became a rich industrial nation producing aircraft, ships, weapons, vehicles, and food not only for the national war effort but also for the country's allies. In the "Hamilton Spectator," as well as in other newspapers, the war was seen as a struggle to save Great Britain, the mother country of so many Canadians, from being wiped off the map.

Site: Canadian War Museum

War Economy and Controls: Agriculture - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: Document

The war in Europe created a need in Canada to help supply food to our allies. It also created a problem with finding manpower to work the farms while so many of our young men went to serve. News articles discussed this problem and possible solutions.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canada and the Second World War - Conscription. 1939-1945

Type: Document

In April 1942, the federal government held a national plebiscite asking Canadians to release it from its “no conscription” pledge. While more than 70% of Canadians voted “yes”, four-fifths of Quebecers voted “no”.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Politics and Government: William Lyon Mackenzie King - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

William Lyon Mackenzie King, head of the Liberal government throughout the Second World War, was Canada's greatest political survivor. His constant wartime goal, and greatest success, was to prevent the split between English and French Canada which had occurred over compulsory military service during the First World War. Canadian newspapers reported on this prime minister's numerous challenges.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Politics and Government : Conscription - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

Conscription, or compulsory military service, divided the nation in the Second World War and threatened the survival of political leaders. Features newspaper articles pertaining to the conscription issue.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Les Purs Canadiens - French Canada and Recruitment during the first World War

Type: Document

When Canadians learned they were at war in 1914, few Canadians could have predicted at this time that their nation soon would become a major participant in the worst conflict the world had yet seen, or that the war would place enormous political and social strains on Canada. Following the nation-wide outbursts of patriotism in August 1914, French-Canadian support for the war began to decline. There existed among French Canadians a tradition of suspicion and even hostility towards the British Empire, and, while sympathetic to France, Britain’s ally, few French Canadians were willing to risk their lives in its defence either.

Site: Canadian War Museum