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Organization > Canadian War Museum

Life on the Homefront: Hamilton, Ontario, a City at War - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

Stories of the contributions of the industrial centre of Hamilton to the war effort, both through military might and industry, make up a large part of the Spectator clippings in this collection.

Site: Canadian War Museum

War Economy and Controls: Shipping and Shipbuilding - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

The growth of Canada's shipbuilding industry from three shipyards to 90 plants during the Second World War was documented in newspaper accounts of the day.

Site: Canadian War Museum

War Economy and Controls - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: Document

The government took full control of the economy, and turned it into a war-winning weapon. There were shortages and rationing of food and other products but everyone who wanted to work could. Workers were encouraged to put their money into Victory loans and savings schemes. Newspapers were there to help encourage individuals and businesses to do their part.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Life on the Homefront: Salvage - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

During the Second World War, recycling was called salvage. Recycling initiatives allowed every Canadian to participate in the war effort.

Site: Canadian War Museum

War and the Foundation of Canada - Collision of Cultures

Type: Document

As early as 1000 CE, encounters between Europeans and First Peoples often led to violence.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canada and the First World War - Canada between the Wars. 1919-1939

Type: Document

Aside from creating the Royal Canadian Airforce in 1924, the Canadian government avoided large expenditures for developing its armed forces between the end of the First World War and the beginning of the Second World War.

Site: Canadian War Museum

War Economy and Controls: Aircraft Production - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

During the Second World War, the Canadian aircraft industry grew to employ nearly 116,000 workers, 30,000 of whom were women. It delivered aircraft to fill Allied orders and Canadian newspapers monitored its expansion.

Site: Canadian War Museum

War Economy and Controls: Munitions - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

The Department of Munitions and Supply controlled the production of munitions for Canada and its allies. By 1945 Canada's war production was fourth among the Allied nations.

Site: Canadian War Museum

War Economy and Controls: Wage and Price Controls - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: Document

The wartime government of Canada attempted to keep the cost of living from rising by announcing a freeze on prices and the setting of levels for wages and salaries. The steps taken and the effects on the Canadian public were documented in articles in three English language papers archived by the Hamilton Spectator.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Life on the Homefront: Women and the War on the Homefront - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

With so many men in the armed forces and with industries pushing for more production, the Canadian government actively urged women to participate in the war effort.

Site: Canadian War Museum