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Organization > Canadian War Museum

Life on the Homefront: Hamilton, Ontario, a City at War - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

Stories of the contributions of the industrial centre of Hamilton to the war effort, both through military might and industry, make up a large part of the Spectator clippings in this collection.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canadian Armed Forces: Canadian Prisoners of the Axis Powers - Canada and the war - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

Almost 9,000 members of Canada’s armed forces became prisoners of the enemy during World War II, as well as several hundred Canadian civilians. Undernourishment and boredom were the prisoners' great enemies. There were worries at home about prisoners in the deteriorating conditions of 1945, but nearly all were liberated by the advancing Allied armies, including the Russian Red Army, or freed themselves when the enemy surrendered.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canada at War - Democracy at War - Canadian Newspapers and the Second World War

Type: DocumentImage

The war changed Canada. It became a rich industrial nation producing aircraft, ships, weapons, vehicles, and food not only for the national war effort but also for the country's allies. In the "Hamilton Spectator," as well as in other newspapers, the war was seen as a struggle to save Great Britain, the mother country of so many Canadians, from being wiped off the map.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Life on the Homefront: Veterans and Veterans' Programmes - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

The government created the Department of Veterans Affairs to deal with matters affecting veterans and their dependents, principally medical treatment; rehabilitation of the disabled; education; insurance; welfare; allowances, pensions and loans; and land settlement and housing. They were at their busiest in 1947 dealing with returned service people. It is still responsible for Canada's veterans.

Site: Canadian War Museum

War Economy and Controls: Shipping and Shipbuilding - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

The growth of Canada's shipbuilding industry from three shipyards to 90 plants during the Second World War was documented in newspaper accounts of the day.

Site: Canadian War Museum

War Economy and Controls - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: Document

The government took full control of the economy, and turned it into a war-winning weapon. There were shortages and rationing of food and other products but everyone who wanted to work could. Workers were encouraged to put their money into Victory loans and savings schemes. Newspapers were there to help encourage individuals and businesses to do their part.

Site: Canadian War Museum

War Economy and Controls: Agriculture - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: Document

The war in Europe created a need in Canada to help supply food to our allies. It also created a problem with finding manpower to work the farms while so many of our young men went to serve. News articles discussed this problem and possible solutions.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Life on the Homefront: Salvage - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

During the Second World War, recycling was called salvage. Recycling initiatives allowed every Canadian to participate in the war effort.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Halifax VE Day Riots, 7-8 May 1945 - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: Document

In Halifax, the excitement of VE Day combined with the strains placed on a small coastal town, its population, resources, and military personnel by the war. This combination led to fatalities and property damage caused by tragic riots. Canadian newspapers covered the incident.

Site: Canadian War Museum

War Economy and Controls: Aircraft Production - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

During the Second World War, the Canadian aircraft industry grew to employ nearly 116,000 workers, 30,000 of whom were women. It delivered aircraft to fill Allied orders and Canadian newspapers monitored its expansion.

Site: Canadian War Museum