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Subject > Politics and Society > War Victims

Date > 1900

Ships Lost in the Battle of the Gulf of St. Lawrence

Type: Document

A list of ships lost in the Battle of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Listed beside each ship is the number of lives lost (where known), the date the vessel sunk, and the U-boat that was responsible.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Canadian POWs

Type: Document

During the First World War nearly 3,000 Canadians became prisoners of war.

Site: National Defence

Commemoration - Battle of the Gulf of St. Lawrence

Type: Document

Many of those whose lives were claimed by the Battle of the Gulf of St. Lawrence have no known grave. Their lives, and their sacrifices, are commemorated on Commonwealth War Graves Commission memorials on both sides of the Atlantic. This website gives account of these memorials and awards.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Nursing Sisters' Memorial

Type: Document

The Nursing Sisters' Memorial is located in the Hall of Honour in the centre block on Parliament Hill. The sculptor was Mr. G.W. Hill, R.C.A., of Montréal. The completed panel was mounted in the Hall of Honour during the summer of 1926. In the Programme given at the presentation on Parliament Hill, the artist interprets the sculptured panel.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Mary Riter Hamilton - Traces of War - Remnants

Type: DocumentImage

Excerpt from an interview with Mary Riter Hamilton is accompanied here by paintings. Focuses on what remains standing after the horrors of war. The spirit of hope shows through in a painting entitled "Looking Outwards."

Site: Library and Archives Canada

Battle of the Atlantic - Operations - Democracy at War

Type: Document

The Battle of the Atlantic was the struggle for control of the sea routes between the Americas and Europe and Africa. German forces attempted to break Britain’s vital supply link from the United States and Canada. During this six year conflict both sides suffered losses of personnel and materials.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Japanese Internment Re-examined

Type: Film and Video

Debunking of myth of threat posed by Japanese-Canadians during the Second World War, through interviews with both government officials and victims of internment. Argument that it was in fact the very act of resettling and interning Japanese-Canadians that could have alienated them enough to pose a threat in case of Japanese invasion of the Pacific coast.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Canada and the Second World War - Canada at D-Day. 1944

Type: Document

On 6 June 1944, Allied forces invaded Western Europe along an 80-kilometre front in Normandy, France. Of the nearly 150,000 Allied troops who landed or parachuted into the invasion area on D-Day, 14,000 were Canadians.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canada’s Military Effort: Summing Up

Type: Document

Canada’s effort during the First World War was exceptional given its small population and its military history. Those Canadians who sacrificed their lives are remembered in the many monuments and cemeteries in Europe.

Site: National Defence

Canadian Armed Forces: Canadian Prisoners of the Axis Powers - Canada and the war - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

Almost 9,000 members of Canada’s armed forces became prisoners of the enemy during World War II, as well as several hundred Canadian civilians. Undernourishment and boredom were the prisoners' great enemies. There were worries at home about prisoners in the deteriorating conditions of 1945, but nearly all were liberated by the advancing Allied armies, including the Russian Red Army, or freed themselves when the enemy surrendered.

Site: Canadian War Museum