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Organization > Veterans Affairs Canada

Subject > Politics and Society > Domestic Politics and International Relations

Quick Facts - Teachers' Resources - War, Remembrance, and Peacekeeping

Type: Document

This resource provides links to information on Canada's involvement in wars and peacekeeping in the 20th century.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Epilogue to Valour Remembered - Canadians in Korea

Type: Document

On July 27, 1953 the Korea Armistice Agreement was signed at Panmunjom, ending three years of fighting. For the first time in history an international organization had intervened effectively with a multinational force to stem aggression.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Take Time to Remember - Teacher's Guide - Activities for Kindergarten to Grade 3 Classes

Type: Document

This guide is designed to aid educators with activities intended to teach young children in Kindergarten to Grade 3 about Canada's participation in wars of the 20th century.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Canadian Reaction to the Invasion - Canadians in Korea

Type: Document

The first Canadian aid to the hard-pressed UN forces involved in the Korean War came from the Royal Canadian Navy. On July 12, 1950, three Canadian destroyers, HMCS Cayuga, HMCS Athabaskan, and HMCS Sioux, were dispatched to Korean waters to serve under the United Nations Command.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Invasion and World Reaction - Canadians in Korea

Type: Document

As North Korean forces pushed southward, the UN effectively declared war on North Korea. World wide reaction to this invasion, the first open act of aggression since the establishment of the United Nations Organization, was swift. All members of the newly formed world organization were called on to aid the Republic of Korea (South Korea).

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Long Wait Begins - Canadian Troops in World War Two

Type: Document

Discussion of Canada's initial policy of limited involvement in the Second World War and how circumstances caused this to change.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Background of the Conflict - Canadians in Korea

Type: Document

At the end of World War II, Korea, formerly Japanese territory, was occupied by the Soviet Union in its north half and the United States in its south half. As the Cold War intensified in the western hemisphere, so, too, did tensions between Korea's communist and democratic halves.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Keeping the Peace - Postcards for Peace -Teachers's Guide - Activities for Grades 6 to 13

Type: Document

The role of Canadian peacekeepers and peacekeeping is discussed in this teachers' guide. Topics include history, purpose; functions and tasks, and past and present missions. Links to a class activity titled Postcards for Peace are included.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Agreement for the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan

Type: Document

At the start of World War II, the British Government looked to the Dominions for air training help because the United Kingdom did not have the space to accommodate training and operational facilities, and because aerodromes in the United Kingdom were vulnerable to enemy attack. Upon considering the U.K.’s September 1939 proposal, Canadian Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King believed the training plan would be "the most essential military action that Canada could undertake".

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Landing at Inchon - Canadians in Korea

Type: Document

Following the Inchon landings and the UN successes of September and October 1950, the end of the war in Korea seemed imminent. It was, therefore, decided to limit the Canadian contribution to one battalion to be used for occupation duties.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada