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Sir John Johnson House National Historic Site of Canada

Type: Document

Sir John Johnson House is significant for its architectural design and for being one of the oldest surviving buildings in Ontario. Also important is its historical connection to Sir John Johnson, who encouraged United Empire Loyalist to settle in the St. Lawrence River Valley after the American Revolution.

Site: Parks Canada

This Week in History: Archives : Heroine of Verchères : Madeleine de Verchères

Type: Document

In January of 1998, Parks Canada introduced a weekly Web Site named This Week in History, which presents a variety of events that have shaped Canada’s past, present and future. These short texts are summaries, not complete histories, meant to entice the reader to explore Canadian history. Search by keyword or by title.

Site: Parks Canada

The British Lay Siege to Louisbourg

Type: Document

In June 1758, a British fleet and army arrived off Île Royale, and the siege of Louisbourg began. It lasted five weeks, thanks to strong fortifications and the determination of the outnumbered defenders. French surrender was followed by deportation of the civilian population.

Site: National Defence

Queen Anne of Great Britain

Type: Image

Queen Anne reigned from 1702 to 1714. This statue of her stands at St. Paul’s cathedral, London. Following its capture in 1710, Port-Royal in Acadia was renamed Annapolis Royal in the Queen's honour.

Site: National Defence

Hospitals

Type: Document

Hospitals in New France were founded and maintained by religious orders of the Roman Catholic church. The cost of the institutions was borne by the state, in return for which officers, soldiers and sailors received free care, food and medicine.

Site: National Defence

This Week in History: Archives: Laura Secord

Type: Document

In January of 1998, Parks Canada introduced a weekly Web Site named This Week in History, which presents a variety of events that have shaped Canada’s past, present and future. These short texts are summaries, not complete histories, meant to entice the reader to explore Canadian history. Search by keyword or by title.

Site: Parks Canada

Meals

Type: Document

British army rations during the 18th and 19th centuries were dull but adequate. Each day, a man got 1 pound (489 g) of bread or flour, 1 pound of beef (or ½ pound of salt pork), a little butter and cheese and a pint (0.568 l) of beer. Vegetables or other items had to be bought by the soldier.

Site: National Defence

Housing

Type: Document

British army barracks during the 18th and 19th centuries were laid out like crowded dormitories. Each room housed a company (50-100 men) plus any wives. Beds or bunks ran along the sides, with tables and benches down the centre. In Canada, a cast-iron stove heated the room.

Site: National Defence

The Military Wedding

Type: Document

During the 18th and 19th centuries, marriage for the common British soldier was governed mostly by custom. Marriage involved 'leaping over the sword', where bride and groom did just that in the presence of the man's companions. Official permission was needed in theory, but seldom given.

Site: National Defence

Soldiers' Wives

Type: Document

As units moved from posting to posting within the British empire during the 18th and 19th centuries, some soldier's wives (up to 6 per company) were transported with their husbands at government expense. Before each move, a lottery was held. Losers were abandoned without support.

Site: National Defence