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Japanese Balloon Enterprise Against North America

Type: Document

This report is an account of the Japanese balloon attacks against the United States and Canada in the final year of the Second World War, and the measures adopted, especially in Canada, to meet this new type of warfare. It also includes information on the effectiveness of the attacks and the types of weapons dropped by the balloons.

Site: National Defence

Attack on the Island - Hong Kong

Type: Document

A description of the invasion of the island of Hong Kong in World War II, from the time the Japanese forces landed on December 18, 1941 until the Allied surrender on Christmas Day.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Canada and the Second World War - The Battle for Hong Kong. 1941

Type: Document

In November 1941, Canada sent 1975 troops to help garrison the British colony of Hong Kong. Despite fighting valiantly, 290 Canadians were killed in action and 300 more died in capitivity.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Defence of the Island - Hong Kong

Type: Document

A description of how Allied forces defended Hong Kong against Japanese attack in the Second World War.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Nancy Siew - My Grandmother's Wartime Diary - Canada and the Second World War

Type: Document

In these diary excerpts a Chinese woman who lived in the Dutch East Indies during the war shares memories of the harsh Japanese military occupation.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Invasion - Hong Kong

Type: Document

A description of the Japanese attack on Hong Kong during World War II, and the Allied response.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Canada and the Second World War - The War against Japan. 1941-1945

Type: Document

Canada responded to the outbreak of war with Japan by significantly strengthening its Pacific coastal defences. Canadian forces also co-operated with the United States in clearing the Japanese from the Aleutian islands off Alaska.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Rejection of Volunteers

Type: Document

Canada's white-led army discriminated against recruits from visible minority groups. Aboriginals, blacks and Japanese were discouraged from joining the 'white man’s war'. However, when the manpower crisis emerged in 1917, these same communities were reluctant to volunteer when the restrictions were lifted. Only 5,100 visible minority members volunteered for service during the war.

Site: National Defence