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Canada and the Second World War - Canada at D-Day. 1944

Type: Document

On 6 June 1944, Allied forces invaded Western Europe along an 80-kilometre front in Normandy, France. Of the nearly 150,000 Allied troops who landed or parachuted into the invasion area on D-Day, 14,000 were Canadians.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canada and the Second World War - Victory. 1945

Type: Document

On 8 February 1945, the Canadians helped deal a deathblow to German resistance. Fighting through the Rhineland and piercing the formidable Siegfried Line, they penetrated the Reichswald and Hochwald forests.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canada and the Second World War - The Italian Campaign. 1943-1945

Type: Document

In Canada’s first sustained land operation of the war, Canadian troops helped capture Sicily in a five-week campaign beginning 10 July 1943.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Development of the German Defence in the Dieppe Sector, 1940-42 - Information from German War Diaries

Type: Document

This report has been prepared for the purpose of supplying background information on German defences in the Dieppe sector. After the summer of 1941, the defence of the Continental coasts became a matter of ever-increasing urgency and importance to the Germans.

Site: National Defence

Surrender of the German army at Wageningen, the Netherlands, 5 May 1945

Type: Image

Lieutenant-General Charles Foulkes (1903-1969), commander of the 1st Canadian Corps, accepts the surrender of the German army occupation forces in the Netherlands from Generaloberst Johannes Blaskowitz (1883-1948), at Wageningen, the Netherlands, on 5 May 1945. (Library and Archives Canada, PA-116811)

Site: National Defence

Canada and the Second World War - Liberating Northwest Europe. 1944-1945

Type: Document

In September 1944, First Canadian Army fought to liberate the heavily-fortified ports of Boulogne and Calais from Germans in order to allow Britain's desperately-needed supply ships access to dock in Antwerp, Belgium.

Site: Canadian War Museum

A German Legacy

Type: Document

As the American Revolution continued, further German troops arrived in Canada. When the war ended in 1783, most of them returned to Europe, but many chose to settle in Canada. Many German family names in Quebec (and the custom of the Christmas tree in the colony) were a result of this settlement.

Site: National Defence

Road to Falaise

Type: Document

A description of the Canadians' attempts to block the German Army's escape route at Falaise, France, in August of 1944.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

The Campaign in North-West Europe - Information from German Sources - Part III - German Defence Operations in the Sphere of First Canadian Army, 23 Aug - 8 Nov 44

Type: Document

This report deals with the German efforts to delay the progress of First Canadian Army on the extreme left of the Allied forces in the Western theatre after the invasion and battle of Normandy. The bulk of the supporting evidence for this report consists of original contemporary German military documents.

Site: National Defence

German Soldiers!

Type: Document

In the 18th century, small European states would often hire out part of their army when at peace. Britain hired thousands of these men from several German states to bolster hard-pressed British troops in America. The plan was to strike south towards New York from Quebec.

Site: National Defence