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Fort George National Historic Site of Canada: Naval Campaigns 1815 and Biography of Richard Pierpoint - Chart

Type: Document

The chart for the final naval battles of the War of 1812 is the first document on this page. In the second half of the document a concise biography of Richard Pierpoint, one of the first black settlers in the Niagara Region, is given.

Site: Parks Canada

Fort George National Historic Site of Canada - Bibliographies - Underground Railway (The Black experience in Upper Canada.)

Type: Document

A short list of resources detailing the contribution of African-Americans to early Canadian history. Includes material on the black experience during early settlement and the War of 1812.

Site: Parks Canada

Private, service dress, Colored Infantry Company, Upper Canada Incorporated Militia, 1843-1850

Type: Image

Raised in 1838, the Colored Infantry Company recruited from Blacks in Upper Canada was the only provincial unit on duty between 1843 the unit's disbanding in 1850. It served mainly along the American border in the Niagara area. Besides the service dress shown, these Black Canadian soldiers also had the shako and scarlet coat trimmed with white lace for full dress as in the British infantry. Reconstruction by Garth Dittrick. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Fort George National Historic Site of Canada - Bibliographies

Type: Document

This is the title page that links to the bibliography of resources on Fort George National Historic Site. Each link leads to a subtopic of the site's history. The key on this page explains the initials that appear with the bibliography entries.

Site: Parks Canada

The Volunteer Corps

Type: Document

The colony of British Columbia had no militia before joining Canada in 1871. Instead, volunteer corps were raised, especially after tensions with the United States increased during the late 1850s. One unit was raised by escaped American slaves.

Site: National Defence

Private, 2nd Construction Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, circa 1917

Type: Image

The 2nd Construction Battalion was the first military unit of the Dominion of Canada to recruit Canadians of African origin. Racism made it impossible for them to join other units. The Construction Battalion was raised in July 1916, mainly from Nova Scotia volunteers. It served in Nova Scotia and New Brunswick for a year, and was then sent to France, where it served behind the lines building roads and railroads. The 2nd Construction Battalion followed in the footsteps of earlier pre-Confederation units such as Captain Runchey's Company of Colored Men (1812-1815), the Colored Infantry Company (1838-1850), and the Victoria Pioneer Rifle Corps (1860-1866). Reconstruction by Ron Volstad. (Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

The Legacy of the War of 1812

Type: Document

Although largely forgotten today, the War of 1812 had important consequences. The failed American invasions meant Canada could become a separate state, giving some degree of shelter from the American 'melting pot' for Francophones, Loyalists, Amerindians and escaped slaves.

Site: National Defence

1815 - War Ends

Type: Document

As the War of 1812 came to a close, the people who fought on both sides returned to civilian life.

Site: Parks Canada

First World War - General References - The War and Canadian Society

Type: Document

A bibliography of sources that highlight the effects of the First World War on Canadian society. Topics include propaganda, race relations, economics, casualities, women in the workplace and prisoners of war.

Site: Library and Archives Canada

Rejection of Volunteers

Type: Document

Canada's white-led army discriminated against recruits from visible minority groups. Aboriginals, blacks and Japanese were discouraged from joining the 'white man’s war'. However, when the manpower crisis emerged in 1917, these same communities were reluctant to volunteer when the restrictions were lifted. Only 5,100 visible minority members volunteered for service during the war.

Site: National Defence