History Browser

Search Results

Fort George, Upper Canada

Type: Image

In 1794, Jay’s Treaty led to withdrawal of British forces from Fort Niagara. In 1796, work began on Fort George at Newark (present-day Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario), directly across the Niagara River from the older fort. Fort George was the scene of several battles during the War of 1812. It is now a major National Historic Site. The wooden palisade at the centre of this photograph sits on top of the earth-built curtain wall linking two of the fort's six stone bastions, one of which can be seen at the end of the palisade. To the left is a part of the ditch (or 'covered way') surrounding the fort, along with an further earthwork known as a ravelin. The ravelin, with its own wooden palisade and small blockhouse inside, made it more difficult for any attacker to assault the curtain wall.

Site: National Defence

Map of the Niagara Peninsula

Type: Image

This map of the Niagara Peninsula shows the principle settlements and fortifications found in the frontier region during the War of 1812. The map dates from the mid-19th century, and also shows later features such as the Welland Canal (first opened in 1829), several railways, the 1855 Niagara Falls suspension bridge and the site of the 1866 battle of Ridgeway.

Site: National Defence

British Swept from Niagara Peninsula

Type: Document

The Americans followed their April 1813 raid on York with an invasion on the Niagara frontier. Their army swept the British out of Fort George and all the way back to Burlington. A confused night action at Stoney Creek gave the British defenders a victory, stalling further American advances.

Site: National Defence

Americans Invade Upper Canada in the War of 1812 - Introduction to Americans Strike Back - A Question of Loyalties

Type: Document

On October 13, 1812, the garrison at Fort George, on the Niagara River, was awakened by the thunder of heavy guns. Across the river on the American side, Major John Lovett at Fort Grey was doing his best to pound the British defenses to pieces. Their national honour had been shaken by the taking of Detroit two months earlier and now the Americans were responding. This was a full-scale invasion of Upper Canada. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

War of 1812

Type: Document

Fort George, at Niagara, played an important role in the war of 1812 and the campaign of 1813. Here is an outline of the logistics and defenses of the area. Also the role of various population groups such as the allied natives, the local militia, and Runchey's Coloured Corps (comprised of black soldiers) are discussed.

Site: Parks Canada