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Map of the battle of Châteauguay, 26 October 1813

Type: Image

The battle of Châteauguay took place along the east and west banks of the Châteauguay river. There was a narrow cleared area on the west bank (towards the top of this map published in 1815), and it was here that the Canadian defenders manned their abbatis (barricades made of felled trees) on 26 October 1813. Most of the fighting took place on the west bank, but an American attempt to outflank the abbatis led to fierce and confused fighting on the east bank as well. The broken terrain helped the defenders by keeping the invaders from realizing that they outnumbered the Canadians ten to one.

Site: National Defence

Canadian Voltigeurs on the march in 1813

Type: Image

The companies of the Provincial Corps of Light Infantry (better known as the 'Canadian Voltigeurs') would have looked like this in October of 1813 as they marched south from Montreal to take up defensive positions at Châteauguay. Some of the men wear their greatcoats, while others have only their grey uniform coats. At left is an Amerindian scout - possibly a Mohawk from Kanesatake or Kahnawake near Montreal. Reconstruction by Gerald A. Embleton. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Battle of the Châteauguay National Historic Site of Canada - Chronology of the Events Surrounding the Battle

Type: Document

This site provides a brief background of the events leading up to the Battle of Chateauguay. The body of the text is comprised of a chronology of battlefield positions and movements during the battle. Maps are provided to help the user better picture the action.

Site: Parks Canada

Lieutenant-Colonel Charles-Michel d'Irumberry de Salaberry, Canadian Voltigeurs, circa 1813-1815

Type: Image

De Salaberry (1778-1829) was a veteran officer of the British army, with service in the West Indies and the Netherlands. He belonged to one of the most influential families in French Canada. The family enjoyed a long-standing friendship with Prince Edward Augustus, the Duke of Kent and future King William IV. The prince's influence got the young Canadian his first commission, with the 60th (Royal American) Regiment of Foot. De Salaberry raised the Provincial Corps of Light Infantry (Canadian Voltigeurs) in 1812 and won lasting fame in Canada when 300-400 of his troops defeated an American army of over 5,000 men at Châteauguay on 26 November 1813. This engraving, made after the War of 1812, shows de Salaberry in the uniform of an officer of the Canadian Voltigeurs. The circular medal he wears is the Field Officers Gold Medal, a very rare award at the time. This medal of de Salaberry's is in the collection of the Canadian War Museum today. (Library and Archives Canada, C-009226)

Site: National Defence

Private, light infantry company, 3rd Battalion Lower Canada Select Embodied Militia, 1813

Type: Image

This man of the Lower Canada Select Embodied Militia wears the red coat with yellow facings worn by the 3rd Battalion in 1813. Although the British red coats were unpopular with the French Canadian conscripts who made up these units, the colour made these militia units look like regular British troops. At the battle of Châteauguay in October 1813, this very factor helped win the battle for the Canadian defenders. Reconstruction by Gerald A. Embleton. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

300 Versus 3000

Type: Document

The American army attacked the Canadian position at Châteauguay on 26 October 1813, but it could not break through. The defenders use of cover and trickery made the invaders think they faced a far larger force. Added to the steady behaviour of the Canadians, this was enough to win.

Site: National Defence

Barricades along the Chateauguay

Type: Document

The first Americans to meet resistance during their October 1813 invasion of Lower Canada were General Hampton's men, coming up the Châteauguay valley. On 26 October 1813, they hit the barricades defended by Lieutenant-Colonel de Salaberry and his 1,800 Canadians.

Site: National Defence

Introduction to Battle of Châteauguay - A Question of Loyalties

Type: Document

This exerpt from the television series "Canada: A People's History" describes the Battle of Châteaugay during the War of 1812, when Lieutenant-Colonel Charles Michel de Salaberry held off the American invaders on the banks of the Châteaugay River in October 1813. Site includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Battle of the Châteauguay National Historic Site of Canada - Bibliography

Type: Document

A brief bibliography of resources available on the War of 1812 and the Battle of Chateauguay.

Site: Parks Canada

Militiaman, Lower Canada Sedentary Militia, 1813

Type: Image

This image of a Lower Canada Sedentary militiaman is based on the description of a British army surgeon, who encountered several regiments of Sedentary Militia in October of 1813. With the exception of his crossbelts and musket, issued by the British, everything this man wears is civilian clothing. Nevertheless, observers were impressed by the 'air of uniformity' of the militia's clothing. Reconstruction by Gerald A. Embleton. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence