History Browser

Search Results

Private, 1st Regiment of Foot (Royal Scots), 1813-1816

Type: Image

The first battalion of the 1st Regiment of Foot (Royal Scots) served in Canada between 1812 and 1815. This man, marked as one of the regiment's centre companies by his white over red shako tuft, wears the 1812 pattern of uniform that would have been seen in Canada after 1813. This is the uniform that the Royal Scots wore at the battle of Chippawa in July 1814. Reconstruction by Gerald A. Embleton. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Mohawk Warrior from Tyendinaga, 1813

Type: Image

This man is from one of the several Iroquois settlements established in Canada after the American Revolution (1775-1783). With face paint, capot (coat), sash and mitasses (leggings), he is dressed for cold weather. Warriors from several settlements (including Tyendinaga, near Belleville, Ontario) gave outstanding services during the War of 1812. One triumph was at Beaver Dams in June 1813. Warned by Laura Secord, a party of 100 Mohawks from Grand River joined with a 300-strong group of Iroquois from Kanesatake, Kahnawake (both near Montreal, Quebec) and Akwesasne (near Cornwall, Ontario) to force a strong American force to surrender at Beaver Dams on 24 June 1813. Reconstruction by Ronald B. Volstad. (Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Map of the Niagara Peninsula

Type: Image

This map of the Niagara Peninsula shows the principle settlements and fortifications found in the frontier region during the War of 1812. The map dates from the mid-19th century, and also shows later features such as the Welland Canal (first opened in 1829), several railways, the 1855 Niagara Falls suspension bridge and the site of the 1866 battle of Ridgeway.

Site: National Defence

Officer, 100th Regiment of Foot (HRH the Prince Regent's County of Dublin Regiment), circa 1812

Type: Image

The 100th Regiment of Foot (HRH the Prince Regent's County of Dublin Regiment) was a short-lived regiment, raised in 1804 and disbanded again in 1818 after the end of the Napoleonic Wars. Almost all of the regiment's service was in Canada. It took part in battles at Sacket's Harbor, Fort Niagara (1813), Chippewa and Fort Erie (1814). This silhouette gives a very good idea of some of the regimental distinctions used by the 100th. Note the shoulder belt plate with the regimental number and the three feathers badge of the Prince of Wales. The same badge can be seen on this officer's epaullette, as well. The long coat skirts probably date this image to before 1812, when regulations were issued calling for a short-skirted coat. Many officers would have continued to wear their old coats for many years, however. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Major-General Jacob Brown, US Army, circa 1814

Type: Image

Jacob Jennings Brown (1775-1828) was one of the best of the new American generals who emerged in the later years of the War of 1812. He began the war as a New York state militia officer, and was commissioned in the regular army in 1813. Promoted major general, Brown commanded the well-trained 'Left Division' of an American army which invaded Upper Canada in 1814 across the Niagara frontier. This print was based upon a portrait commissioned in 1814 as one of a series showing American heroes.

Site: National Defence

Bloody Exchanges at Chippawa and Lundy's Lane

Type: Document

The Americans, led by General Brown, crossed the Niagara River on 3 July 1814. They swiftly captured Fort Erie, and gave an astonished force of British regulars a bloody nose at Chippawa. The invasion was contained by a confused and very bloody battle at Lundy's Lane.

Site: National Defence