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The Horrors of War

Type: Document

Warfare in the 19th century was horrible, despite the colourful uniforms. In the aftermath of the November 1837 battle of Saint-Charles, a British officer helped two young Canadian women to find their Patriote father. His corpse was found, frozen and contorted, with a horrible head wound.

Site: National Defence

Grenadier officer, 1st, or The Royal Regiment of Foot, 1838

Type: Image

This officer of the elite grenadier company of the 1st, or The Royal Regiment of Foot wears the regiment's full dress uniform. Because the fighting in Lower Canada took place during the winter months, this handsome dress would have been covered by a warm grey greatcoat in the field. (Library of the Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Battle of St. Charles, 25 November 1837

Type: Image

This contemporary illustration shows the charge of the 1st, or The Royal Regiment of Foot, at the battle of St. Charles. At left is the manor house of seigneur Pierre-Dominique Debartzch. It was the Patriote stronghold during the battle. Note the burning Dupuis House at right. (Library and Archives Canada C-130814)

Site: National Defence

Map of the Montreal area at the time of the 1837-1838 Rebellions

Type: Image

The rebellions occurred mainly in the Richelieu River Valley in Saint-Denis and Saint-Charles, as well as in Saint-Eustache and in the vicinity of Beauharnois.

Site: National Defence

Sir George Augustus Wetherall (1788-1868)

Type: Image

Lieutenant-Colonel Wetherall, 1st, or The Royal Regiment of Foot, won the battle of St. Charles on 25 November 1837. This print shows him later in life, in the uniform of a British general. (Library of the Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

Battle of Saint-Charles - Rebellion and Reform

Type: Document

British troops killed 150 Patriotes and dealt a severe blow to the Lower Canada rebels at the Battle of Saint-Charles in the Richelieu Valley on November 25, 1837. This excerpt from the television series "Canada: A People's History" discusses the battle and the effect it had on the Patriote rebellion. Site includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

British Crush Opposition at Saint-Charles

Type: Document

The second engagement of the Lower Canada Rebellion of 1837 saw British troops crush a gathering of Les Patriotes at Saint-Charles. When some rebels pretended to surrender and then opened fire again, the troops bayoneted many of them and then burned the village.

Site: National Defence