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First World War: Gas! Gas!

Type: Film and Video

Belgium's Ypres is a scene of carnage and ruin, throbbing with murderous machine gun and artillery fire and littered with unburied corpses. As if this vision of hell on earth isn't bad enough, a new innovation is turning the very air to deadly poison. In April 1915, the Germans unleash the horrific weapon of chlorine gas on Canadian troops. As we hear in this item from CBC Radio's Ideas, the new weapon is terrifying, but the Canadian line does not break.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

'The Most Dangerous Spot in the World'

Type: Film and Video

From 1914-1918, the Menin Gate in Ypres, Belgium was the deadliest place in Europe. It was once a transportation hub, but the war quickly reduced it to "just a battered track between heaps of wreckage." Three major battles left hundreds of thousands dead, and more than a million wounded. As we see in this clip, a group of citizens makes sure that these sacrifices are remembered every day.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

First World War - Troops and Traditions - Canadian Expeditionary Force

Type: DocumentImage

A comprehensive bibliography of resources on the Canadian Expeditionary Force, including official history, accounts of specific battles and the role of war technologies.

Site: Library and Archives Canada

Ypres 1915 - On The Western Front - Canada and the First World War

Type: Document

During the weeks of April 1915 the fledgling Canadian army faced its first devastating battles. Amid huge losses, the Canadians established a reputation as a formidable fighting force.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

In Flanders Fields - John McCrae

Type: Document

In April 1915, John McCrae, now a major and a brigade-surgeon, was in the trenches near Ypres, where he witnessed the devastation of battle. Moved by the deaths of fallen comrades, he composed his famous poem "In Flanders Fields."

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Ypres Defended

Type: Document

The Canadian reputation as soldiers was made at the battle of Ypres, where they held the line against the first German gas attack.

Site: National Defence

St. Julien Memorial

Type: DocumentImage

Built to honour those who fought and died during the first gas attacks of World War One, it is one of the most striking of all the battlefield memorials on the Western Front. The description of this monument and the battle for which it stands reminds Canadians of today of the valour shown by our armed forces in April of 1915 .

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Dawn of Chemical Warfare - Horror on the Battlefield - First World War

Type: Document

During the First World War, gas attacks killed or injured an estimated 1,296,853 soldiers. Canadian troops were front and centre during some of the first uses of such attacks in the war. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

World War One: Casualties by Battle

Type: Document

A comparison of the losses sustained in several battles involving the Canadian Corps in World War One.

Site: National Defence

Canada and the First World War - The Canadian Expeditionary Force. 1915-1917

Type: Document

Between 1915 and 1917, Canadians engaged in trench warfare. They endured a year-long war of attrition and poison gas attacks. By October 1916, the number of Canadians fighting overseas had grown to 80,000.

Site: Canadian War Museum