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D-Day: 'The Last Just War'

Type: Film and Video

A historian and a journalist discuss the historical significance of D-Day.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Canada and the Second World War - Canada at D-Day. 1944

Type: Document

On 6 June 1944, Allied forces invaded Western Europe along an 80-kilometre front in Normandy, France. Of the nearly 150,000 Allied troops who landed or parachuted into the invasion area on D-Day, 14,000 were Canadians.

Site: Canadian War Museum

D-Day: The Enemy Responds

Type: Film and Video

Herbert Walter remembers the early hours of D-Day well. A member of the Hitlerjugend -- a young, well-trained, passionate group of Nazi soldiers -- he heard the planes begin their attack. "It was so noisy. I said, 'they are coming.'" Werner Kortenhaus remembers too. When the attack began, his unit awaited orders to counterattack, but it would be hours before those orders came. On the 50th anniversary of D-Day, the two German vets recount their D-Day experiences.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Canadian Participation in the Operations in North-West Europe, 1944 - Part III - Canadian Operations, 1-23 August

Type: Document

This report presents a detailed narrative of Canadian operations in Normandy during the period 1-23 August 1944.

Site: National Defence

D-Day: Paratroopers drop in

Type: Film and Video

It's a few minutes past midnight, Tuesday, June 6, 1944. As most of the Allied forces wait nervously for dawn, D-Day has already begun for Slim Sklalicky and Lionel Trudel. They're paratroopers with the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion, assigned to drop inland and seize bridges and causeways. In this CBC news clip 50 years later, the two vets say high winds and the "ack-ack" of enemy fire made for a tough jump.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Ranville War Cememtery

Type: Document

Ranville, near Caen, was the first village to be liberated in the D-Day landings. The cemetary there contains the graves of 76 Canadians including nine members of the RCAF, three CANLOAN officers and 57 members of the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

D-Day: 'We Have Every Reason for Confidence'

Type: Film and Video

Mackenzie King has led Canadians through the darkest days of the Second World War. But it's only for momentous developments in the war that the prime minister addresses the country by radio -- and D-Day definitely counts as momentous. On a day when the country is especially anxious for news from overseas, King describes the invasion as "the opening of what we hope and believe will be the decisive phase of the war against Germany."

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

D-Day Remembered 50 Years on

Type: Film and Video

World leaders and veterans gather in Normandy to commemorate the 50th anniversary of D-Day.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

From Normandy to the Netherlands - Canada and the Second World War, 1939-1945

Type: Document

The Canadians experienced hard fighting against the powerful Panzer divisions in Normandy, but eventually drove the Germans back. The German armies weakened, and retreated to their own frontiers as they prepared for a last desperate stand.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

1st Canadian Parachute Battalion in France, 6 June - 6 September 1944

Type: Document

This is the history of the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion and its involvement in the Allied Invasion of France. The period covered is from D-day, June 6, 1944, to the unit's return to England on September 6, 1944. It replaces a previous report on this Battalion.

Site: National Defence