History Browser

Search Results

Subject > Weapons, Equipment and Fortifications > Weapons

Organization > Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Dr. Gerald Bull: A Supersonic Scientist

Type: Film and Video

After working with wind tunnels in university, Gerald Bull is developing ways to use a gun to launch a missile.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Leading Fleet to Canada - General James Wolfe - Battle for a Continent

Type: Document

General James Wolfe returns to Canada in the spring of 1759, ready to do battle in Quebec, with a fleet of 200 ships. Wolfe, seasick, and suffering from rheumatism and tuberculosis was not cheered by what awaited him. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Dr. Gerald Bull - Scientist, Weapons Maker, Dreamer

Type: DocumentFilm and VideoSound

Dr. Gerald Bull was like a figure in a spy novel, designing arms for some of the world's harshest regimes. With no shortage of possible enemies, he died at the hands of an unknown assassin. But the Canadian-born artillery expert was also a brilliant scientist with a dream: to launch a satellite with a giant gun.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Bombing Ignites the City - Battle for Quebec - Battle for a Continent

Type: Document

The British siege of Quebec began the night of Thursday, July 12, 1759. In that first day, three hundred British bombs fell on Quebec. Many churches were destroyed. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Canada's CF 18s - Canadians in Combat in the Gulf War

Type: Film and Video

Canadian forces are in combat for the first time in decades. Four Canadian fighter jets flew into Iraqi airspace, escorting allied attack planes in Operation Desert Storm.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Halifax Explosion - Turmoil on the Homefront - First World War

Type: DocumentFilm and Video

The largest explosion the world had ever known destroyed much of Halifax city. On the morning of December 6, 1917, two ships collided and caught fire in Halifax harbour, igniting 3,000 tonnes of munitions and explosives. Six square kilometres of Halifax was simply wiped out. The explosion killed 2,000 people and wounded another 9,000. It was the most devastating disaster on Canadian soil. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Montcalm Launches Fireboats - Battle for Quebec - Battle for a Continent

Type: DocumentFilm and Video

At midnight, June 28th, 1759, General Marquis de Montcalm launches his attack. He sends boats and rafts carrying gunpowder to ignite their cargo near the English fleet, anchored off Ile d'Orleans. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, video clips, and biography of General Montcalm.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Missile Threats and Scud Alerts at Canada Dry - Canadian Forces in Qatar during the Gulf War

Type: Film and Video

Report on Canadian forces at Canada Dry 1, one of two Canadian bases in Qatar. Iraqi scud missiles are being fired at Bahrain, close to the Canadian base in Qatar. Gas masks must be readily available and although the missile threat in Qatar is considered low, every warning is treated as if it is the real thing.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Introductory Activity: Grades 6-12: What Was the Cold War About? - For Teachers

Type: Document

Students explore a CBC Archives website to gather some first impressions and background information on the Cold War era and its impact on Canadian society and politics.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Reinforcements from Europe - Another Fight for Quebec - Battle for a Continent

Type: Document

After the French victory at the Battle of Ste. Foy, both the French and British armies waited to see whose navy would first come up the St. Lawrence. After eleven days of suspense, a ship appeared. The British had won the transatlantic race. William Pitt had sent 22 ships from England. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation