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Subject > Weapons, Equipment and Fortifications > Equipment, Materials and Infrastructure

Organization > Veterans Affairs Canada

Digital War Art

Type: ImageDocument

Reji Martin has used the tools of today to remember the battles of the past. In this collection of 'Virtual' oil pastels, the terrible beauty of people and places involved in war has been caught using a computer program.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

The Second World War

Type: Document

When Canada join World War II, the nursing service was expanded to all three branches of the military; Navy, Army and Air Force. Each branch had its own distinctive uniform and working dress, while all wore the Nursing Sister's white veil and were commissioned officers. The Sisters travelled overseas by ship in convoys, running the gauntlet of German submarine action in the North Atlantic.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Brothers in Arms

Type: Document

Alexander Smith Jr. earned his Military Cross in France in September 1916 during the second Allied assault on the Somme. When the war ended, he was also named an Officer of the Order of the Black Star, a Polish order, one of only five Canadians to receive this honour. His younger brother, Charles Denton Smith earned his Military Cross in Mons Belgium and received it in France on November 9, 1918 - two days before the war ended.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Wilfred D. "Dick" Ellis - communications and transportation - Canada in the First World War

Type: DocumentSound

Wilfred D."Dick" Ellis speaks about his experience as a communications and transportation surveying specialist. Includes transcript and glossary.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

The Park Ships - In WWII

Type: Document

Cargo ships produced under the Canadian program that were constructed for Canada and the Commonwealth were named after federal, provincial and municipal parks. The Park ships began arriving in 1942 and quickly became the dominant element of the World War II merchant fleet.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Expanding the Merchant Fleet - In WWII

Type: Document

In October 1940, Great Britain turned to Canadian and American shipyards to replace its lost merchant ships. In the face of the now urgent need, Canada embarked on a massive shipbuilding program.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Epilogue - Valour at Sea - Canada's Merchant Navy

Type: Document

The Battle of the Atlantic was the longest battle of the Second World War continuing unbroken from the first day of the war, September 3, 1939, to the last day of the war in Europe, May 8, 1945. All told the history of the Merchant Navy in Canada's wars is one of fortitude, courage and achievement. The ships and the volunteers who served in them made the difference between victory and defeat for the Allies. Fortress Europe could not have been invaded without them.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Canada's Merchant Navy - Valour at Sea

Type: Document

Table of contents for the online version of the booklet written by Patricia Giesler and Veterans Affairs Canada. It deals with the activities of the Canadian Navy during the First and Second World Wars.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

In the First World War - Valour at Sea - Canada's Merchant Navy

Type: Document

The very outcome of World War I depended on the successful transport of troops and goods over the oceans. Shipping troops, munitions, horses, supplies and other provisions, was a major component of Canada's naval effort and taxed Canadian resources to the limit. From an average of 45,000 tonnes of cargo a month in 1915, shipping from Canada would increase to 351,000 tonnes a month in 1918.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Rio Logie - My Grandmother's Wartime Diary - Canada and the Second World War

Type: Document

A brief account of one woman's experiences as part of the Women's Royal Navy in Britain is presented -- an example of many vital military functions that were fulfilled from behind the lines of battle.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada