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Date > 1700

Subject > Politics and Society > War Victims

Bombing Ignites the City - Battle for Quebec - Battle for a Continent

Type: Document

The British siege of Quebec began the night of Thursday, July 12, 1759. In that first day, three hundred British bombs fell on Quebec. Many churches were destroyed. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Harsh Terms of Surrender

Type: Document

Since the fortifications of Montreal were too weak to withstand a siege by the British in September 1760, French commanders Vaudreuil and Lévis were forced to surrender. The terms were harsh, with the defenders being refused the honours of war.

Site: National Defence

Treatment Of Prisoners

Type: Document

One problem of raid warfare was the treatment of prisoners - they were often brutally tortured, as was the custom of the Amerindians. This was ironic, as the Canadians themselves had suffered badly this way from the Iroquois.

Site: National Defence

The Americans Repulsed

Type: Document

During the battle of New Year's Eve of 1775, a column of American rebels led by General Arnold made one last attack on Quebec City. Arnold was wounded and many of his men captured when British governor Carleton attacked the rebels from behind.

Site: National Defence

Once Again, War with the Foxes

Type: Document

Eager to restore their standing after the humiliation of 1716, the Foxes began fighting with the Illinois nation, French allies. At the same time, they established a series of alliances with other groups. A French-led expedition burned Fox villages in 1728, but victory was only partial.

Site: National Defence

A Strategic Problem

Type: Document

During the rest of the 1690s, the Iroquois and French traded raids. The Iroquois settlements suffered greatly, while the Amerindians felt they were being poorly supported by their English allies. Exhausted, the Iroquois signed a peace treaty with France in 1701.

Site: National Defence

British in Quebec - Winter 1759-1760 - Battle for a Continent

Type: Document

On September 18, 1759, the British flag was raised over Quebec City. The English had taken the city, but it was a desolate prize of confusion, civil disorder, pillage, failing crops, encroaching famine, and scurvy. James Murray was the new governor of the colony. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Ethnic Cleansing Prompted by Greed

Type: Document

Since 1713, the former French colony of Acadia had been part of British Nova Scotia. The large population of francophone Roman Catholics was a source of worry and jealousy to the authorities, and in July 1755, Governor Lawrence deployed troops to forcibly deport the Acadians.

Site: National Defence

A Strong Move

Type: Document

The first move in the campaign of 1757 was by the French. Governor Vaudreuil sent Montcalm to take Fort William Henry, hoping to forestall British attacks north along Lake Champlain. The fort was taken, but there was a massacre of prisoners of war by Amerindians.

Site: National Defence

French Attempts to Destroy a People

Type: Document

Governor General Beauharnois now encouraged and assisted France's Amerindian allies to destroy the Fox nation. Through 1729 and 1730, the Foxes suffered defeat after defeat. Attempting to flee eastwards, the Foxes were surrounded and massacred in September 1730.

Site: National Defence