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Date > 1800

Subject > Politics and Society > Life on the Homefront

Militia Budgets

Type: Document

The budgets allocated by Parliament often affected the size of the militia and how many men would be trained. Cycles of economic crisis and boom in the 1870's had an impact on militia activity and proficiency.

Site: National Defence

A Series of Amerindian Nations

Type: Document

During the eighteenth century, the northwest Pacific coast was home to a series of Amerindian nations, including the Tlingit, Haida, Tsimshian, Nootka and Salish. These were maritime cultures - excellent sailors and fishermen who depended on the sea's resources

Site: National Defence

World War l - History

Type: DocumentFilm and Video

Listing of films and newsreels regarding Canada's involvement in World War 1. Here are narratives to help remember some of the great battles and soldiers of that time. The contributions and sacrifices made by ordinary Canadians are also documented.

Site: National Film Board of Canada

Social Changes

Type: Document

The new British way of defending colonies led to great social changes in Canada during the late 18th century. With no professional colonial army to join, the elite of Canadian society lost much income and influence. As well, British soldiers developed no roots in the colony.

Site: National Defence

Training and the Evolution of the Militia

Type: Document

The founding of the Royal Military College in 1876 and the building of the Dominion Arsenal at Quebec improved the militia and its equipment, but many challenges remained. Developments within Canada, such as the creation of the transcontinental railway, influenced the formation of the militia with more units being formed in the cities rather than the countryside.

Site: National Defence

Holding Up Half the Sky: Women's History Lesson Plan

Type: Document

"Women hold up half the sky" is a saying that values the contributions of women to our world. This activity introduces some of Canada's remarkable female "agents of change" and the organizations with which they worked.

Site: Parks Canada

Regular British Troops Arrive

Type: Document

The Oregon Crisis of 1845 made it important to send British regular troops to Rupert's Land. A detachment of the 6th Regiment of Foot arrived in 1846, becoming the first British unit stationed on the prairies. The threat of an American attack from the south was an ongoing worry.

Site: National Defence

Drink and Women

Type: Document

Alcohol was the only escape from a highly regulated life for many British soldiers during the 18th and 19th centuries. As a result, drunkenness and alcoholism were common. With roughly 90% of the men bachelors, prostitution and venereal disease were also big problems.

Site: National Defence

From Colony to Country - South African War- Women - Women

Type: DocumentImage

A source list of published works on the role of Canadian women in South Africa during and after the Boer War, representing both their military and civilian contributions.

Site: Library and Archives Canada

Cadet corps of the Zouaves pontificaux canadiens, Sacré-Coeur Parish, Chicoutimi, 1924

Type: Image

In French Canada, cadets were often attached to the Zouaves pontificaux canadiens. This Francophone religious paramilitary group was founded in 1899 by Charles-Edmond Rouleau. At the time it was believed that the Zouaves were more attuned to the French-Canadian community than the Anglophone-commanded Canadian Militia. The cadets' uniforms were modelled on those of the régiment des Zouaves pontificaux, a volunteer unit that was part of the army of the Papal State. Almost 400 Canadians served with the unit in Rome between 1868 and 1870. (Lemay photo, 1924. Archives nationales du Québec à Chicoutimi, 68810)

Site: National Defence