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Date > 1800

Subject > Politics and Society > War Victims

"For Queen and Country" - Canadians and the South African War, 1899-1902

Type: Document

An article about the origins of the South African War and Canada's involvement in it. Includes reading list.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Major Arthur L. ("Gat") Howard (1846-1901) - South African War

Type: Document

Major Arthur L. (Gat) Howard accepted the position of machine gun officer in the 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles (later called the Royal Canadian Dragoons). Instead of returning home from the South African War with his unit in December 1900, Howard organized the Canadian Scouts and took command of the unit.

Site: Canadian War Museum

The Horrors of War

Type: Document

Warfare in the 19th century was horrible, despite the colourful uniforms. In the aftermath of the November 1837 battle of Saint-Charles, a British officer helped two young Canadian women to find their Patriote father. His corpse was found, frozen and contorted, with a horrible head wound.

Site: National Defence

Lieutenant-Colonel William D. Otter (1843-1929) - South African War

Type: Document

Lieutenant-Colonel William D. Otter became the first Canadian-born officer to command this country’s military. As commanding officer of the 2nd Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment of Infantry in South Africa, his no nonsense, no frills approach to soldiering brought him into conflict with the less disciplined ways of his officers and men, but his austere professionalism got results.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Photo Gallery - South African War

Type: Image

A photo gallery is presented here commemorating fallen Canadians. Some photos of veterans appear in the collection as well as the cemetaries where they were buried and monuments memorializing their contribution to the war.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Canada within the Empire - The South African War. 1899-1902

Type: Document

Over 7300 Canadian volunteers served in South Africa in October 1899, when the British Empire and the two small South African Boer republics of Transvaal and the Orange Free State went to war. Canada's participation advanced Canadian nationalism, but the war also magnified domestic linguistic and cultural differences.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Upper Canadian Patriotism

Type: Document

The 1838 Rebellion in Upper Canada led to a huge call up for the militia. More than 20,000 were under arms, supporting British troops in the colony. In later years, the population remembered the rebellions more for this outpouring of patriotism than for its relatively few casualties.

Site: National Defence

Royal Canadian Dragoons in the South African War

Type: Document

In November 1899, the Canadian government offered a second contingent consisting of horse-mounted infantry and field artillery.These men were already experienced horsemen and good shots. The Royal Canadian Dragoons was perhaps the most effective Canadian unit to serve in South Africa.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Growing Canadian Nationalism

Type: Document

Canadian participation in South Africa fostered a growth in Canadian nationalism due to the social differences between Canadians and the British, the British Army's mistreatment of lower ranks, and the desire of Canadian politicians to control what they saw as Canadian troops. Memories of the combatants to the horrors of the war receded over time and new Canadian military myths were created.

Site: National Defence

A Brutal Retribution

Type: Document

With Patriote forces at Saint-Eustache beaten in December 1837, British regulars and loyalist volunteers sacked the town, burning and looting. In the days following the battle, two other towns were burned, and undisciplined volunteers pillaged the surrounding countryside.

Site: National Defence