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Date > 1800

Subject > Strategy and Tactics > Special Operations

The Battle for the Northwest

Type: Document

American plans called for the recapture of Fort Mackinac in 1814. An attack was defeated by a British ambush in August. The Americans were able to destroy the famous British ship Nancy shortly thereafter, but lost two ships of their own on Lake Huron in September.

Site: National Defence

Officer, Glengarry Regiment of Fencible Light Infantry, 1812-1816

Type: Image

When the Glengarry Regiment of Fencible Light Infantry were raised in 1812, they were given uniforms that copied the 95th Regiment of Foot, a prestigeous British rifle regiment that had built a fine reputation serving against the French in Spain. The officers of the Glengarry regiment wore the same dark green jacket with black facings and silver buttons. The crimson officer's sash was worn over the right shoulder in the fashion of Scottish regiments - appropriate for a unit whose recruits included many emmigrants from Scotland. Reconstruction by Robert J. Marrion. (Canadian War Museum)

Site: National Defence

Private, Glengarry Regiment of Fencible Light Infantry, 1812-1816

Type: Image

Correctly fearing the outbreak of war with the United States, Governor General Provost ordered the creation of the Glengarry Regiment of Fencible Light Infantry early in 1812. Recruiting began in the Scottish settlements on the St. Lawrence River in Upper Canada (present-day Ontario), but soon expanded to include the Maritime colonies and the rest of Upper Canada. The unit saw service throughout the War of 1812. Their uniform - dark green coat with black facings and white lace - was copied from the 95th Regiment of Foot, a specialist regiment of riflemen in the regular British army. The Glengarry Light Infantry were armed with muskets, however, not rifles. Reconstruction by Gerald A. Embleton. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Iroquois Terrorize Americans Into Surrender

Type: Document

Warned by Laura Secord, British Lieutenant Fitzgibbon ordered that the Americans be ambushed by a body of Iroquois warriors. While fewer in number, the Amerindians scared the Americans so much that the invaders surrendered with relief when FitzGibbon's British troops finally arrived.

Site: National Defence

Cross-border Incidents

Type: Document

In late December 1837, Mackenzie's Patriot radicals, supported by American sympathizers, set up a republic on an island in the Niagara River. Loyalist volunteers (led by a British officer) destroyed an American ship supplying the rebels. A diplomatic storm followed.

Site: National Defence