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Date > 1800

Subject > Wars, Battles and Conflicts > French Regime, 1603-1760

Militia of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island

Type: Document

This report discusses the organizational features of the militia of the separate provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island prior to Confederation.

Site: National Defence

Canadian Militia Prior to Confederation

Type: Document

This report discusses the growth and development of the Canadian Militia from its beginnings in early New France until Confederation in 1867.

Site: National Defence

Signal Hill National Historic Site of Canada: History

Type: Document

With its obvious strategic location, Signal Hill became the site of harbour defences from the 18th century through the Second World War. The last battle of the Seven Years' War in North America was fought here in 1762.

Site: Parks Canada

Militiamen raising the May pole in front of their captain’s house

Type: Image

The tradition of raising the May pole in front of the Militia captain's house, which began in the era of New France, went on in French Canada until the middle of the 19th century.

Site: National Defence

Records of the 4th International Colloquy on Military History (Ottawa 23.25 VIII 1978) Date of Publication: 1979

Type: Document

Introduction by W.A.B. Douglas, Director Directorate of History, Program Chairman. Articles in a variety of languages including: English, German, French, Italian, Portugese, Spanish, Russian, Greek.

Site: National Defence

Fort Chambly

Type: Image

The third fort on this site, construction began on Fort Chambly in 1709. It was made of stone and looked rather like a castle. This made it different from the low-lying, bastioned fortresses of Europe. The fort was built to be impressive and all but impregnable to Indian enemies and raiding American colonials. The fort wall facing the Richelieu River was pierced for artillery. During the War of 1812, Fort Chambly was the HQ for British and Canadian troops guarding the area south of Montreal against an advance by American armies. The complex fell into ruins during the 19th century. Its walls were stabilized in 1885 when it was made a Canadian government historic park. Recognized as a unique surviving example of military architecture, Fort Chambly was given a major restoration in the 1980s by Parks Canada. This returned the fort to its appearance of the mid-18th century.

Site: National Defence

Introduction to the Study of Military History for Canadian Students

Type: Document

This publication offers nine examples of Canadian campaigns chosen from different periods of history. It also includes a very brief history of the development of Canadian Army organization. The Principles of War, in the form adopted by the Canadian Chiefs of Staff, are printed as an appendix.

Site: National Defence

Regiments and Units Serving in Canada 1755-1871

Type: Document

A list of the regiments and other units of the American, British, Canadian, French and Spanish militaries that served in present-day Canada during the period 1755-1871. Included are the dates of each unit's service, and the modern-day provinces in which the service was done.

Site: National Defence

A Crow nation chief in full regalia

Type: Image

The Crow nation roamed Montana and northern Wyoming, overlapping the Saskatchewan border. Horses, first brought into Mexico by the Spanish in the early 16th century, had profoundly transformed the lifestyle and fighting tactics of the plains Indians by the 18th century.

Site: National Defence

Changing Boundaries 1756-1871

Type: Interactive Resource

Series of five maps illustrate the shifting boundaries of European land claims in North America from 1756 to 1871.

Site: National Defence