History Browser

Search Results

Date > 1900

Subject > Politics and Society > Life on the Homefront

Canadian Army - World War II Archival Films

Type: DocumentAnimationFilm and Video

Listing of films from the National Film Board. Archival footage includes training films and news magazines from the Second World War.

Site: National Film Board of Canada

Keen-Eyed Women Volunteer for Aircraft Detection Corps - Second World War

Type: Sound

Reporter Marion Angus describes the work of female ADC plane-spotters in this 1943 radio broadcast. These homefront volunteers sight, recognize (ie. identify) and report aircraft flying overhead.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Life on the Homefront: Hamilton, Ontario, a City at War - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

Stories of the contributions of the industrial centre of Hamilton to the war effort, both through military might and industry, make up a large part of the Spectator clippings in this collection.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Japanese Internment Re-examined

Type: Film and Video

Debunking of myth of threat posed by Japanese-Canadians during the Second World War, through interviews with both government officials and victims of internment. Argument that it was in fact the very act of resettling and interning Japanese-Canadians that could have alienated them enough to pose a threat in case of Japanese invasion of the Pacific coast.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Canadian Armed Forces: Canadian Prisoners of the Axis Powers - Canada and the war - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

Almost 9,000 members of Canada’s armed forces became prisoners of the enemy during World War II, as well as several hundred Canadian civilians. Undernourishment and boredom were the prisoners' great enemies. There were worries at home about prisoners in the deteriorating conditions of 1945, but nearly all were liberated by the advancing Allied armies, including the Russian Red Army, or freed themselves when the enemy surrendered.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Japanese Canadians: Redress Opposition

Type: Film and Video

Canadian war veterans discuss and explain the reasons behind their opposition to reparations for Japanese-Canadians.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Canada at War - Democracy at War - Canadian Newspapers and the Second World War

Type: DocumentImage

The war changed Canada. It became a rich industrial nation producing aircraft, ships, weapons, vehicles, and food not only for the national war effort but also for the country's allies. In the "Hamilton Spectator," as well as in other newspapers, the war was seen as a struggle to save Great Britain, the mother country of so many Canadians, from being wiped off the map.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Queen Asks Canadian Women to Help War Effort - Canadian Women in the Second World War

Type: Sound

As war breaks out, Queen Elizabeth, consort of King George VI, speaks to Canadian women in this 1939 Armistice Day broadcast about the roles they must play.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

War Years - Esther Lundy - My Grandmother's Wartime Diary - Canada and the Second World War

Type: Document

While life on the homefront during wartime could be difficult there were also happier moments of goodwill and friendship.

Site: Veterans Affairs Canada

Patriotism on the Home Front - Second World War- Fighting From the Home Front

Type: Document

Synopsis of television episode on patriotism and government propaganda in Canada during the Second World War. Discusses the sacrifices individuals were expected to make to support the war effort and the introduction of Victory Bonds to support wartime expenditures. This episode is part of the "Canada: A People's History" series. Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation