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Officer, Glengarry Regiment of Fencible Light Infantry, 1812-1816

Type: Image

When the Glengarry Regiment of Fencible Light Infantry were raised in 1812, they were given uniforms that copied the 95th Regiment of Foot, a prestigeous British rifle regiment that had built a fine reputation serving against the French in Spain. The officers of the Glengarry regiment wore the same dark green jacket with black facings and silver buttons. The crimson officer's sash was worn over the right shoulder in the fashion of Scottish regiments - appropriate for a unit whose recruits included many emmigrants from Scotland. Reconstruction by Robert J. Marrion. (Canadian War Museum)

Site: National Defence

Soldier, Butler's Rangers, 1778-1783

Type: Image

Butler's Rangers were uniformed in green, with red facings. This man, dressed for campaigning, wears his lapels buttoned over. There is record of a leather cap worn by the unit, but reconstruction shows an unofficial substitute - a kerchief. There is also some information that Butler's men wore green smocks on some occasions. All in all, this famous (or infamous) regiment must have presented a very mixed appearence in the field. Reconstruction by G. A. Embleton. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Private, Glengarry Regiment of Fencible Light Infantry, 1812-1816

Type: Image

Correctly fearing the outbreak of war with the United States, Governor General Provost ordered the creation of the Glengarry Regiment of Fencible Light Infantry early in 1812. Recruiting began in the Scottish settlements on the St. Lawrence River in Upper Canada (present-day Ontario), but soon expanded to include the Maritime colonies and the rest of Upper Canada. The unit saw service throughout the War of 1812. Their uniform - dark green coat with black facings and white lace - was copied from the 95th Regiment of Foot, a specialist regiment of riflemen in the regular British army. The Glengarry Light Infantry were armed with muskets, however, not rifles. Reconstruction by Gerald A. Embleton. (Parks Canada)

Site: National Defence

Sergeant Harold A. Marshall, The Calgary Highlanders, Belgium, 6 October 1944

Type: Image

This painting is based on a famous 6 October 1944 picture taken by Canadian war photographer Ken Bell. Sergeant Harold A. Marshall was the sergeant of the scout platoon of The Calgary Highlanders. He was a sniper, trained and equipped to kill at long range. Marshall carries a SMLE no. 4 Mk 1 (T) rifle fitted with a sniper scope. He wears a 'Denison smock,' designed for use by paratroops, but adopted by snipers because of its camouflage pattern. Over his head the sergeant wears his green and brown mesh face veil. Reconstruction by Ron Volstad. (Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence

‘Ruse de guerre des Canadiens’ [Canadian Stratagem] by André Thévet

Type: Image

This 1575 print is possibly the first published European depiction of an Indian engagement in Canada. (Library and Archives Canada C-017653)

Site: National Defence

The storming of St John's, Newfoundland, 30 December 1696

Type: Image

French soldiers and 120 Canadian militiamen led by Pierre Le Moyne d’Iberville and Governor de Brouillan of Placentia raided the English part of Newfoundland between October 1696 and May 1697. The campaign was an outstanding military success, crippled the English colony. The French and Canadian forceds took over 700 prisoners and causing some 200 casualties while suffering trifling losses.

Site: National Defence

Rating, Beach Commando 'W', Royal Canadian Navy, 1944

Type: Image

The Royal Canadian Navy had only one unit that bore the famous designation 'commando': Beach Commando 'W'. The unit was trained to go ashore on D-Day in the dark before the first assault troops. Their job was to secure the beach area and send out signals about landing conditions. Despite months of training in Scotland, the Canadians were not sent ashore on D-Day. They landed three days later to relieve Beach Commando 'P,’ a British unit. The men of Commando 'W' spent many weeks as troubleshooters and traffic police, guiding landing craft to safely ashore and sending men and equipment to their destinations. This rating is shown in 1942-issue British battle dress, wearing the new Mk III helmet and carrying a Lanchester machine gun. The unit wore the Combined Operations Patch as well as 'Canada' flashes on the upper arm. Reconstruction by Ron Volstad. (Canadian Department of National Defence)

Site: National Defence