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Subject > Politics and Society > Information and Media

VE Day, 8 May 1945 - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

VE Day marked the end of the war in Europe. Canadians still overseas in Paris and London as well as those at home danced in the streets. The Hamilton Spectator archived articles dealing with reactions in Eastern Canada.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Politics and Government: Parliament - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

For Canada and Canadians the Second World War began in Parliament. Canadian newspapers documented the changes in government and social platform during World War Two.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canadian Army - World War II Archival Films

Type: DocumentAnimationFilm and Video

Listing of films from the National Film Board. Archival footage includes training films and news magazines from the Second World War.

Site: National Film Board of Canada

Canadian Armed Forces: Demobilization - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

As World War II war drew to a close, members of all the armed forces of the Allies wanted nothing so much as to shed their uniforms, and fast. But there was not enough shipping available to bring Allied troops from all over the world as quickly as they wished.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Politics and Government - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: Document

The Liberals, headed by Prime Minister Mackenzie King, steered Canada through some rocky waters during the war years. The challenges the government faced were well documented in the English language newspapers of the time.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Battle of the Atlantic - Operations - Democracy at War

Type: Document

The Battle of the Atlantic was the struggle for control of the sea routes between the Americas and Europe and Africa. German forces attempted to break Britain’s vital supply link from the United States and Canada. During this six year conflict both sides suffered losses of personnel and materials.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Life on the Homefront: Hamilton, Ontario, a City at War - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

Stories of the contributions of the industrial centre of Hamilton to the war effort, both through military might and industry, make up a large part of the Spectator clippings in this collection.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canadian Armed Forces: The Royal Canadian Navy (RCN) - Canada and the War - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

The Royal Canadian Navy grew rapidly during the Second World War. The roles it played in military actions ranged from acting as an escort force for merchant ships to fighting German submarines and landing on the coast of German-occupied France as part of major operations. Some of the experiences of the Canadian Navy were recorded in newspapers of the time.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canadian Armed Forces: Canadian Prisoners of the Axis Powers - Canada and the war - Democracy at War

Type: DocumentImage

Almost 9,000 members of Canada’s armed forces became prisoners of the enemy during World War II, as well as several hundred Canadian civilians. Undernourishment and boredom were the prisoners' great enemies. There were worries at home about prisoners in the deteriorating conditions of 1945, but nearly all were liberated by the advancing Allied armies, including the Russian Red Army, or freed themselves when the enemy surrendered.

Site: Canadian War Museum

Canada at War - Democracy at War - Canadian Newspapers and the Second World War

Type: DocumentImage

The war changed Canada. It became a rich industrial nation producing aircraft, ships, weapons, vehicles, and food not only for the national war effort but also for the country's allies. In the "Hamilton Spectator," as well as in other newspapers, the war was seen as a struggle to save Great Britain, the mother country of so many Canadians, from being wiped off the map.

Site: Canadian War Museum