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Americans Forced On the Defensive

Type: Document

Trying to strike back at the Loyalist raiders who caused such trouble, the American rebels sent troops to destroy Iroquois settlements in 1779. Although thousands of refugees were forced to flee, the raids continued with increased strength, with the rebels generally on the losing side.

Site: National Defence

A Return To Earlier Methods

Type: Document

After 1777, in order to keep the American rebels on the defensive, the British adopted the old Canadian tactic of raiding enemy settlements. The raids were made by mixed groups of Amerindians and soldiers. The troops used were American loyalists such as Butler's Rangers.

Site: National Defence

Another Round Of Iroquois Wars

Type: Document

The Iroquois pressed their advantage, raiding and spreading fear among the colonists. A French attempt to force a pitched battle was unsuccessful.

Site: National Defence

The European Failure

Type: Document

Unlike the Spanish Central America, Europeans were unable to successfully colonize North America in the 16th Century. Amerindian guerrilla tactics combined with a cold and hostile land to frustrate the newcomers. Nevertheless, North America became a theatre of war for European conflicts.

Site: National Defence

Hostilities Between Settlers and Natives

Type: Document

The border region between Upper Canada and the United States became troubled during the early 1790s. British garrisons remained in several posts south of the Great Lakes, and American troops were fighting a campaign against an alliance of several Amerindian nations in 1790-1791.

Site: National Defence

Rebellion on the Plains - North West Rebellion

Type: DocumentFilm and Video

A description of the Métis and Indian involvement in the Northwest Rebellion of 1885. The settlers' reaction to the threat of Indian uprising and the military backlash to actions taken by the rebels are also discussed. From the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Attack on Schenectady - Claiming the Wilderness

Type: Document

A brief description of the guerilla raid on Albany in the English colony of New York by Canadian militiamen and Indians. It began with an attack on the fortified English village of Schnectady, which had been ordered by Frontenac and led by coureurs des bois. Taken from the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

Butler's Rangers - The American Revolution - Join or Die - A Question of Loyalties

Type: Document

Many Loyalists who fled the Thirteen Colonies formed guerrilla armies that were Britain's most effective weapon against the American Revolution. The most notorious of them all was Butler's Rangers, led by John Butler, a wealthy New York landowner who recruited Loyalists and Indians from the Six Nations to fight the Americans. The story of Butler and his Rangers is the subject of this excerpt from the television series "Canada: A People's History." Includes links to educational resources, bibliography, games, puzzles, and video clips.

Site: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

300 Versus 3000

Type: Document

The American army attacked the Canadian position at Châteauguay on 26 October 1813, but it could not break through. The defenders use of cover and trickery made the invaders think they faced a far larger force. Added to the steady behaviour of the Canadians, this was enough to win.

Site: National Defence

Last Struggles of the Foxes

Type: Document

Even after this disaster, the Foxes were not silenced. In 1733, the remnants of the nation formed a new alliance with the Sauks in Iowa and attacked a French party. A punitive expedition was mounted without success, and in 1737 the French 'pardoned' the Foxes.

Site: National Defence